Class page for the Wintersemester 2013 GW course

Instructors: D. Hilditch and N. K. Johnson-McDaniel

Course syllabus (RTF PDF)

Lecture slides:

NKJ-M's introductory lecture (2up 4up)
NKJ-M's lecture on GWs from quasicircular binaries to "Newtonian" order (2up 4up)
NKJ-M's lecture on GWs from eccentric binaries to "Newtonian" order (2up 4up)
NKJ-M's overview of stellar and binary formation and evolution (2up 4up)
NKJ-M's brief sketch of PN and black hole/stellar perturbation theory methods and results (2up 4up)
NKJ-M's lectures on (GW) data analysis and the response of interferometers to GWs (2up 4up)

See the previous year's lecture slides here for NKJ-M's take on much of the material DH is presenting in Chap. 1.

Homework:

Problem Set 1
Problem Set 2
Problem Set 3
Problem Set 4
Problem Set 5
Problem Set 6
Problem Set 7 (from R. Nawrodt)
Problem Set 7 (extra credit data analysis problems)

Links about the current week's material:

László Gergely's paper about the dynamics of spinning compact binaries.

Mike Boyle's PN evolution code.

Chandrasekhar and Detweiler's Schwarzschild QNM paper; see also this paper about the QNMs of various simple potentials.

Here is the complete list of supplementary links.

Other materials:

The linearized gravity notebook from Charalampos Markakis, plus an older tensor calculation notebook.

Notes on the "difficult way" of obtaining the quadrupole formula. (See also Maggiore's errata for further pedagogical discussion of this point.)

Useful general links for the class:

The Flanagan and Hughes review
(I'm linking to its page on ADS, so you have links both to the published and arXiv versions; the latter will be available off campus. While ADS is at heart astronomy-oriented, it's really quite good for physics, as well, and you might want to learn how to use it, since it has many powerful features for making your way through the literature.) But note that their Eqs. (4.23) and (4.26) have rather unfortunate omissions in the published version! [The omission in Eq. (4.23) is corrected in the arXiv version.]

The Blandford and Thorne textbook on classical physics (available online here) contains a chapter (no. 26) on gravitational waves.

There is also an online course on gravitational waves from Caltech.

Marc Favata's GW resources page.

Sean Carroll's GR course notes (with some links to other online GR notes/tutorials)

Alessandra Buonanno's GW lecture notes

Jonathan Gair's GW course slides.

Living Reviews in Relativity

The JASON report about the infeasibility of proposed technological applications of high-frequency gravitational waves. See also a paper proposing generating GWs using a nuclear explosion (!).

Kip Thorne's review on multipoles for gravitational radiation.

Daniel Kennefick's eprint about controversies in the history of the radiation reaction problem in GR.

PN links:

Eric Poisson's PN notes (N.B.: Direct link to a PDF.)

Luc Blanchet's PN Living Review (just recently updated).

The standard papers on the DIRE approach to PN: Will and Wiseman, and the two Pati and Will papers.